MOIRA BY THE CHURH, GOA

Award-winning, uniquely-designed, two-level, 710 sq. m bungalow built on a 1,297 sq. m plot in serene Moira village, with stunning views of the Moira Church and paddy fields, developed by designer Vikram Goyal.

The colour palette inside the house, whether in the objects or the upholstery, pivots between shades of beaten gold, khaki, brown and black, culminating in a brilliant flourish of camouflage that gives visitors a peek into the owner’s psyche—part trendy, full revolutionary. The courtyard has pillar-shaped fountains that are also laterite; lit up at night, they look like lingams. The extensive use of laterite as ornamentation and as an architectural element is revelatory. There is more stone—Kadappa and Machala—and naked concrete on the ceilings. The surface of the house is rugged. The walls are made of exposed laterite—a local Goan stone that is rust-coloured, like terracotta, and used to its best advantage as it is here, juxtaposed with the dark luxury of the rest of the home.

Architectural Digest India, March 2017

APARTMENT IN MUMBAI

The apartment opens into a main room with a heartstopping view of the sea and the faint, washed water colour routine of Cuffe Parade in the distance. Goyal removed unseemly partitions from the room to give it the look of an expansive loft—framing, as it were,the drama of the sea. Instead of breaking down the columns, Goyal used them as punctuation points dividing the space into a foyer, a living room, and an alcove that seems almost dangling over the breaking waves below.

RESIDENCE IN NEW YORK

PENTHOUSE IN NEW YORK

Designer Vikram Goyal’s interview with AD, November 2014

“We wanted the space to reflect the homeowners’ roots and personalities—multicultural art collectors of Indian origin who had made New York City their home—and that it be warm and inviting, a serene oasis in the city. We married oriental and occidental, antique and modern, by mixing Indian art and sculptures with modernist American furniture and lights; an antique Persian rug with current artistic versions; contemporary designs in metal with mid-20th-century objects in glass and lucite.
Over the years, the owners have built a great collection of Indian art. We wanted to continue the narrative of the paintings interacting with the objects in the rooms. For example, in the foyer, we placed the FN Souza painting of the banyan tree above the Buddha figure on the golden console. In the dining room, we designed the modernist brass sconces to complement the abstract modernism of the FN Souza portrait. Because the living room is a gathering place, we placed an MF Husain canvas depicting the unity of various faiths and communities. In the foyer, the Justin Ponmany artwork was set against the metallic wallpaper.”

APARTMENT IN CHENNAI

Goyal noted for his very glamorous spaces, creativity and utter devotion to excellence in finish and design, knew instantly how to marry the couple's international aesthetic with more superior elements of Indian design. The drama begins in the foyer, where an Oscar-worthy red-carpet line-up of 15 dancing baby Krishna sculptures on a terracotta wall makes the entrance a truly joyous thing to walk into. Off the foyer is the supremely dramatic study – a room of great contrast – with delicate touches like the fine line drawings by Palaniappan, fine-boned brass consoles and Indonesian bronze figures paired with sensational, soaring Tibetan panels, massive mouth-bared, hind-legged Yalli sculptures and Agra finials. In direct line of sight from the study is the large magnificent Shrinathji Pichwai that dominates one wall of the master bedroom.

Architectural Digest India, Mar/Apr 2013

BUNGALOW IN CHENNAI

The mandate for the bungalow on a quiet, tree-lined, street in tropical Chennai in south India was to keep it “simple but distinct”, “airy and sunny” and with “an abundance of art deco”.  Graphic patterns in black and white marble were painstakingly crafted on to the floors.  Most of the furniture in wood and brass was bespoke as were the accessories. The tall art deco handle in brass on the main door is a striking feature at the point of entry. The dining room lights and table are vintage.

RESIDENCE IN NEW DELHI

Tucked in a quiet tree-lined avenue in New Delhi, This home is quite the opposite of the street; in fact, the drama begins in the foyer of the house with its dusky pink floors, soaring doors, the wildly different Chinese brocade panels, a marvellous 18th-century carved  Chinese table overlooked, with a gimlet eye, by a woman in a Vietnamese painting. This is a home built copiously for the senses.

Each room in this house tells a story. The long living room, with its pink and ebony marble flooring, is not unlike a glamorous train carriage that captures foliage – palms, banana trees, frothy bougainvillea – all the way through from both sides. The colours used in the interiors are a nod to Cartier's famed ‘Tutti frutti’ necklaces (visible in the colour lampshades in eau-de-nil, moss, hot pink and chartreuse), and the furniture is inspired by the languorous, louche elegance of art deco.      

Architectural Digest India, Jan/Feb 2013

DUPLEX RESIDENCE IN NEW DELHI

Homes speak their own language. Some homes whisper calming hymns, while some ooze melodrama, and then there are those homes that are so exquisite or so ugly that they leave you speechless. This home, which reflects (his) background in products and interior design (he owns the design store, Viya Home, and is co- founder of Kama Ayurveda), is an elegant Nina Simone song, remixed to a gorgeous beat of Now.     

In the living room, the all-pervasive sexiness of black and gold, especially on the exquisite brocade sofas, is reminiscent of a matador's traje de luces, or the 'suit of lights' costume. This flamboyance is further unfurled by a brass art deco bench polished to a dull gold and standing with insouciance, like a libidinous 1930s flapper girl, on a gleaming black terrazzo floor. Two art deco chairs excavated from the flea markets of Goa sit in the centre of the room, daringly outfitted in bridal red and gold Tibetan upholstery in the louche darkness. India Modern at its fabulous zenith.

Architectural Digest India, Mar/Apr 2012

MOIRA BY THE CHURH, GOA

Award-winning, uniquely-designed, two-level, 710 sq. m bungalow built on a 1,297 sq. m plot in serene Moira village, with stunning views of the Moira Church and paddy fields, developed by designer Vikram Goyal.

The colour palette inside the house, whether in the objects or the upholstery, pivots between shades of beaten gold, khaki, brown and black, culminating in a brilliant flourish of camouflage that gives visitors a peek into the owner’s psyche—part trendy, full revolutionary. The courtyard has pillar-shaped fountains that are also laterite; lit up at night, they look like lingams. The extensive use of laterite as ornamentation and as an architectural element is revelatory. There is more stone—Kadappa and Machala—and naked concrete on the ceilings. The surface of the house is rugged. The walls are made of exposed laterite—a local Goan stone that is rust-coloured, like terracotta, and used to its best advantage as it is here, juxtaposed with the dark luxury of the rest of the home.

Architectural Digest India, March 2017

APARTMENT IN MUMBAI

The apartment opens into a main room with a heartstopping view of the sea and the faint, washed water colour routine of Cuffe Parade in the distance. Goyal removed unseemly partitions from the room to give it the look of an expansive loft—framing, as it were,the drama of the sea. Instead of breaking down the columns, Goyal used them as punctuation points dividing the space into a foyer, a living room, and an alcove that seems almost dangling over the breaking waves below.

RESIDENCE IN NEW YORK

PENTHOUSE IN NEW YORK

Designer Vikram Goyal’s interview with AD, November 2014

“We wanted the space to reflect the homeowners’ roots and personalities—multicultural art collectors of Indian origin who had made New York City their home—and that it be warm and inviting, a serene oasis in the city. We married oriental and occidental, antique and modern, by mixing Indian art and sculptures with modernist American furniture and lights; an antique Persian rug with current artistic versions; contemporary designs in metal with mid-20th-century objects in glass and lucite.
Over the years, the owners have built a great collection of Indian art. We wanted to continue the narrative of the paintings interacting with the objects in the rooms. For example, in the foyer, we placed the FN Souza painting of the banyan tree above the Buddha figure on the golden console. In the dining room, we designed the modernist brass sconces to complement the abstract modernism of the FN Souza portrait. Because the living room is a gathering place, we placed an MF Husain canvas depicting the unity of various faiths and communities. In the foyer, the Justin Ponmany artwork was set against the metallic wallpaper.”

APARTMENT IN CHENNAI

Goyal noted for his very glamorous spaces, creativity and utter devotion to excellence in finish and design, knew instantly how to marry the couple's international aesthetic with more superior elements of Indian design. The drama begins in the foyer, where an Oscar-worthy red-carpet line-up of 15 dancing baby Krishna sculptures on a terracotta wall makes the entrance a truly joyous thing to walk into. Off the foyer is the supremely dramatic study – a room of great contrast – with delicate touches like the fine line drawings by Palaniappan, fine-boned brass consoles and Indonesian bronze figures paired with sensational, soaring Tibetan panels, massive mouth-bared, hind-legged Yalli sculptures and Agra finials. In direct line of sight from the study is the large magnificent Shrinathji Pichwai that dominates one wall of the master bedroom.

Architectural Digest India, Mar/Apr 2013

BUNGALOW IN CHENNAI

The mandate for the bungalow on a quiet, tree-lined, street in tropical Chennai in south India was to keep it “simple but distinct”, “airy and sunny” and with “an abundance of art deco”.  Graphic patterns in black and white marble were painstakingly crafted on to the floors.  Most of the furniture in wood and brass was bespoke as were the accessories. The tall art deco handle in brass on the main door is a striking feature at the point of entry. The dining room lights and table are vintage.

RESIDENCE IN NEW DELHI

Tucked in a quiet tree-lined avenue in New Delhi, This home is quite the opposite of the street; in fact, the drama begins in the foyer of the house with its dusky pink floors, soaring doors, the wildly different Chinese brocade panels, a marvellous 18th-century carved  Chinese table overlooked, with a gimlet eye, by a woman in a Vietnamese painting. This is a home built copiously for the senses.

Each room in this house tells a story. The long living room, with its pink and ebony marble flooring, is not unlike a glamorous train carriage that captures foliage – palms, banana trees, frothy bougainvillea – all the way through from both sides. The colours used in the interiors are a nod to Cartier's famed ‘Tutti frutti’ necklaces (visible in the colour lampshades in eau-de-nil, moss, hot pink and chartreuse), and the furniture is inspired by the languorous, louche elegance of art deco.      

Architectural Digest India, Jan/Feb 2013

DUPLEX RESIDENCE IN NEW DELHI

Homes speak their own language. Some homes whisper calming hymns, while some ooze melodrama, and then there are those homes that are so exquisite or so ugly that they leave you speechless. This home, which reflects (his) background in products and interior design (he owns the design store, Viya Home, and is co- founder of Kama Ayurveda), is an elegant Nina Simone song, remixed to a gorgeous beat of Now.     

In the living room, the all-pervasive sexiness of black and gold, especially on the exquisite brocade sofas, is reminiscent of a matador's traje de luces, or the 'suit of lights' costume. This flamboyance is further unfurled by a brass art deco bench polished to a dull gold and standing with insouciance, like a libidinous 1930s flapper girl, on a gleaming black terrazzo floor. Two art deco chairs excavated from the flea markets of Goa sit in the centre of the room, daringly outfitted in bridal red and gold Tibetan upholstery in the louche darkness. India Modern at its fabulous zenith.

Architectural Digest India, Mar/Apr 2012